Canine collaboration: objects, actions and morality

Bartram, Angela (2006) Canine collaboration: objects, actions and morality. In: 4th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, 11-14 Jan 2006, Honolulu, Hawaii.

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Abstract

‘Canine Collaboration: Art, Objects and Morality’ was presented at the Visual Arts panel 11-14 Jan. 2006. The conference was sponsored by the Asia Pacific Research Institute of Peking University, with published proceedings (CD-ROM pp.262-263), and a supporting website. The presentation reflected research in the area of animal deployment in fine art practice, specifically examining the moral, ethical and social implications of artwork produced with canine involvement. Discussion centred on the role of the canine as companion species and pet. The moral dilemmas encountered in the deployment of animals were underpinned by ethical guidelines prescribed by the Royal Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Implied breed-specific behaviour in conjunction with the non-human, mammalian mouth and the perception of anxiety and danger for arts audiences was discussed, with video works and images on this subject being used to illustrate delivery. I have subsequently been invited to guest review the conference in 2007.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information:‘Canine Collaboration: Art, Objects and Morality’ was presented at the Visual Arts panel 11-14 Jan. 2006. The conference was sponsored by the Asia Pacific Research Institute of Peking University, with published proceedings (CD-ROM pp.262-263), and a supporting website. The presentation reflected research in the area of animal deployment in fine art practice, specifically examining the moral, ethical and social implications of artwork produced with canine involvement. Discussion centred on the role of the canine as companion species and pet. The moral dilemmas encountered in the deployment of animals were underpinned by ethical guidelines prescribed by the Royal Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Implied breed-specific behaviour in conjunction with the non-human, mammalian mouth and the perception of anxiety and danger for arts audiences was discussed, with video works and images on this subject being used to illustrate delivery. I have subsequently been invited to guest review the conference in 2007.
Keywords:Dogs, Performance art, Exhibitions
Subjects:W Creative Arts and Design > W100 Fine Art
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Art & Design
ID Code:1076
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:31 Aug 2007
Last Modified:11 Aug 2014 17:07

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