Land and sky

Middleton, Paul (2004) Land and sky. [Show/Exhibition]

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Abstract

An exhibition and catalogue publication with supporting lecture. The Exhibition focuses on drawing as an investigatory tool and explores the juncture at which the recorded image becomes assimilated with the artist’s or designer’s thinking and a cognitive connection is established. This explores the significance of location and how this impacts upon the humanist aesthetic that is recognisable as art or design. The enquiry is also concerned with when and how the viewer establishes an intimate connect with the work and how this differs from the mechanised or digital image. The enquiry uses drawings produced from sketches and photography and analyses the defining characters, aspects and qualities that each engender. The role of photography is specifically explored together with its impact and influence on visual language, how we view and decode visual material. Although photography has defined how we read the contemporary image the drawing work seeks to explore the notion of the connection between drawing and viewer and how the inherent ‘humanist aesthetic’ promotes a link that can only be deduced by an intellectual connection. A comparative analysis between drawings derived from photography and those from sketch provide the focus in an attempt to identify defining characteristics with support or otherwise an intellectual connection.The work points to further exploration of a point of departure where the observed image becomes a perceived or imagined statement; when the mechanised or digitally captured photograph is changed by the process of drawing. In these contexts is drawing simply an agent of change or is there a more meaningful role that it fulfils? What are the similarities and co-dependency between drawing and photography in this enquiry? Do notions of deduced intellectual connection merely relate to the creative processes through which the visual articulation passes rather than a consequence of the act of drawing? What makes drawing particularly effective at capturing the creative processes? Peer review by Dennis Kuronen, Dean of Faculty, University of Philadelphia.

Item Type:Show/Exhibition
Additional Information:An exhibition and catalogue publication with supporting lecture. The Exhibition focuses on drawing as an investigatory tool and explores the juncture at which the recorded image becomes assimilated with the artist’s or designer’s thinking and a cognitive connection is established. This explores the significance of location and how this impacts upon the humanist aesthetic that is recognisable as art or design. The enquiry is also concerned with when and how the viewer establishes an intimate connect with the work and how this differs from the mechanised or digital image. The enquiry uses drawings produced from sketches and photography and analyses the defining characters, aspects and qualities that each engender. The role of photography is specifically explored together with its impact and influence on visual language, how we view and decode visual material. Although photography has defined how we read the contemporary image the drawing work seeks to explore the notion of the connection between drawing and viewer and how the inherent ‘humanist aesthetic’ promotes a link that can only be deduced by an intellectual connection. A comparative analysis between drawings derived from photography and those from sketch provide the focus in an attempt to identify defining characteristics with support or otherwise an intellectual connection.The work points to further exploration of a point of departure where the observed image becomes a perceived or imagined statement; when the mechanised or digitally captured photograph is changed by the process of drawing. In these contexts is drawing simply an agent of change or is there a more meaningful role that it fulfils? What are the similarities and co-dependency between drawing and photography in this enquiry? Do notions of deduced intellectual connection merely relate to the creative processes through which the visual articulation passes rather than a consequence of the act of drawing? What makes drawing particularly effective at capturing the creative processes? Peer review by Dennis Kuronen, Dean of Faculty, University of Philadelphia.
Keywords:Exhibitions, Art
Subjects:W Creative Arts and Design > W100 Fine Art
Divisions:College of Arts > Lincoln School of Art & Design
ID Code:1058
Deposited By: Bev Jones
Deposited On:30 Aug 2007
Last Modified:18 Jul 2011 16:15

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